Combatting Illegal
Wildlife Trade

6 offenders caught in 1st quarter of 2015 for trafficking and
possession of 238 wild/endangered animals.

Illegal trading of wildlife is a highly lucrative activity worldwide. To ensure that the survival of wild animals and plants is not threatened, governments cooperate through the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) to safeguard certain species from over-exploitation.

Singapore is a signatory to CITES, and AVA is responsible for its implementation and enforcement here. A multi-pronged approach is employed to combat illegal wildlife trade and possession.

Illegal wildlife trade and possession can pose significant impacts to public safety and animal health in Singapore. Wild animals are not suitable pets as some may transmit zoonotic diseases to humans. These animals can pose a risk to public safety if they are mishandled or if they escape into our dense urban environment. Animals that are non-native to Singapore may also be a threat to our biodiversity if released into the environment.

Here are six cases where offenders were caught in the first quarter of 2015 for trafficking and possession of 238 wild/endangered animals. Under the Endangered Species (Import and Export) Act, the maximum penalty for illegal trade (import, export and re-export) of wildlife listed under CITES is a fine of $50,000 per scheduled specimen and/or imprisonment of up to two years. The same penalty applies to any transhipment, as well as illegal acquisition or possession.